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UHM Chancellor visits China, meets with Vice Minister of Education

UH Mānoa Chancellor Virginia Hinshaw met with Vice Minister of Education Hao Ping (MA '95 Mānoa) at the Ministry of Education of the People's Republic of China in Beijing on Dec. 8.
On Dec. 9, Hinshaw and Beijing Foreign Studies University president Chen Yulu signed an agreement to continue their collaboration on the Confucius Institute at UH Mānoa. The schools jointly operate programs to promote education about Chinese language & culture.
Zhang Huijun, Beijing Film Academy president and Hinshaw signed an agreement on Dec. 9 to facilitate student and faculty exchange with UH Mānoa's Academy for Creative Media.

On Dec. 8, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Chancellor Virginia Hinshaw met with Vice Minister of Education Hao Ping (MA ’95 Mānoa) at the Ministry of Education of the People’s Republic of China in Beijing. Hao, who studied at UH and recently received the East-West Center’s 2010 Distinguished Alumni Award, expressed gratitude for his education.

Hinshaw said, “Hao Ping is a wonderful example of our UH Mānoa alumni – people who are truly making a difference in the world and also have a strong connection with and affection for their university.”

During the meeting, Hao spoke highly of the exchanges between UH and China. He encouraged Hinshaw to continue facilitating collaboration between UH Mānoa and Chinese universities, and he offered his full support for such partnerships.

Hinshaw recently received similar encouragement from Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. In a letter to U.S. higher education leaders in January, Clinton urged them to double the number of U.S. students their schools send to study abroad in China by 2014 as part of President Obama’s “100,000 Strong” State Department initiative, which aims to significantly increase opportunities for Americans to study in China. Clinton’s letter stated: "Today, more than ever, there is a global understanding that no major challenge can be resolved without the active engagement of both the United States and China. That is why President Obama has called upon the nation to build up a cadre of Americans knowledgeable about Chinese history, culture, and language – a generation of Americans who study China and have studied in China."

During Hinshaw’s visit, Hao introduced her to a representative of the China Scholarship Council (CSC), a non-profit institution affiliated with the Ministry of Education that provides financial assistance to Chinese citizens to study abroad and to foreign citizens to study in China. In response to the 100,000 Strong initiative, the Chinese government is offering 10,000 scholarships to Americans students and teachers.

To further advance UH Manoa’s collaborative education efforts with China, the delegation visited Beijing Foreign Studies University (BFSU), where Hao was immediate past president.

On Dec. 9, Hinshaw and current BFSU president Chen Yulu signed an agreement to continue their collaboration on the Confucius Institute at UH Mānoa (CI-UHM), which is part of the Center for Chinese Studies. CI-UHM was established in November 2006 to promote education about Chinese language and culture. The program, operated jointly by UH Mānoa and BFSU, is funded by the Confucius Institute Headquarters (Hanban) of the Ministry of Education of the People’s Republic of China.

Later that day, Hinshaw and the UH delegation visited Beijing Film Academy, the most prestigious film school in China. Hinshaw and Beijing Film Academy president Zhang Huijun signed an agreement to facilitate student and faculty exchange with UH Mānoa’s Academy for Creative Media.